Dessert


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he dessert is commonly used to round off a good meal. The word comes from the French “desservir”: its literal translation is to “clear the table”. Needless to say that to enjoy this stuff you don’t really have to be sitting at a table!

FOOD IN THIS SECTION:

Cakes, pastries, biscuits, cream, ice cream … delicacies made with sugar.




Cicero's cannoli. Cicero's cannoli.

Cicero’s cannoli.

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he “cannolo” is one of the most famous food specialities from Sicily. It’s not easy to determine exactly its origins. One thing is for sure: in 70 BC the great Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero described a very similar pastry. (continue)

: Italy




Sachertorte, taste of Vienna. Sachertorte, taste of Vienna.

Sachertorte, taste of Vienna.

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he Sachertorte: its taste is both austere and elegant, something it has in common with the city where it was born, Vienna. It’s hard to savor it without hearing the echo of a waltz, the passage of an ancient carriage or the clink of a sword. (continue)

: Austria




Saint Honoré: the cake of Saint Honoratus. Saint Honoré: the cake of Saint Honoratus.

Saint Honoré: the cake of Saint Honoratus.

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t. Honoré cake is a dessert very much appreciated both in Italy and France. The chef Chiboust invented it in 1846 and naming it after the patron saint of bakers and pastry chefs: Honoré. The holy man was also known as Honoratus, bishop of Amiens, a city famous for its beautiful gothic cathedral.

: France




Pastries of the Venetian carnival. Pastries of the Venetian carnival.

Pastries of the Venetian carnival.

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he Venetian carnival is something so special: born centuries ago, each year it renews its magic. Special as the typical pastries made only in this period and sold by the confectioneries around the city. Let’s taste them together and, surrounded by masks and goldolas, let’s join this incredible event! (coming soon)

: Italy

Voltaire about ice cream ©:1

Baicoi, ancient Venetian biscuits.

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he “baicoi” are very typical biscuits from Venice, part of its oldest confectionery tradition. In the past they were often used as food stock on ships: baked two times (“bis coctus”), they are very dry and so very suitable for long preservation. Their name comes from the dialect word for a small fish, whose elongated shape they resemble.




All the images used in this page, with the exception of those marked with the “webfoodculture” logo, are released in public domain:
©:1 (*) – Voltaire, 1724 Nicolas de Largillière (Wikipedia Link)

(*) The copyright of this image has expired.
(**) Image released in public domain by its author.