Home


W

elcome to WebFoodCulture. In this website food is examined from a particular point of view, that of culture, in the belief that knowing the stories, the information and the fun facts about a speciality can really improve its taste. The international culinary scene is like a huge, precious treasure, full of delicacies for both the palate and the mind: let yourself be guided around the world, finding a new way to eat.




Maraschino and Luxardo (img-06)

Maraschino and Luxardo.

‘M

araschino’, the liqueur loved in the past by kings, artists and intellectuals, is the main ingredient of some of the most famous cocktails. Its captivating flavor comes from a very particular type of cherry, the ‘marasca’. Its charm is the result of long history: centuries during which the name ‘Maraschino’ has been associated to the Dalmatian city of Zara and to several brave and competent entrepreneurial families. Among them, the Luxardos, which still represent the tradition of this tasty specialty. (continue)

: Italy




Crocchè in the vicoli of Naples. Crocchè in the vicoli of Naples.

Crocchè in the vicoli of Naples.

T

he ‘vicoli’ are one of the most typical and interesting places in the city of Naples. Walking through these narrow alleys is like entering a different, strange world: an experience involving all the senses, including taste. Let’s buy a delicious ‘crocchè’ and savor it while strolling around. (continue)

: Italy




Margherita: pizza of Queens (img-01) Margherita: pizza of Queens (img-01)

Margherita: pizza of Queens.

M

any say that ‘Margherita’, the queen of pizzas, derives its name from that of a real one: Margherita of Savoy. Is it true? Well, it’s certainly enough to arouse curiosity and start a little investigation, deepening the knowledge of what is probably the most famous Neapolitan specialty. (continue)

: Italy




Euganean Hills: most typical food. Euganean Hills: most typical food.

Euganean Hills: most typical food.

E

uganean Hills rise up in Northeast Italy, not far from the city of Venice. This group of Volcanic reliefs has few rivals in terms of history, beauty and charm. It’s like a treasure chest, full of precious jewels. Among these, the local food and wine: let’s start knowing and appreciating these delicacies, surrounded by enchanting landscapes. (continue)

: Italy




Asado by an Argentine gaucho (img-02) Asado by an Argentine gaucho (img-02)

Asado by an Argentine gaucho.

T

he literal translation of the word ‘asado’ is ‘roasted’. The ‘gauchos’, undisputed rulers of the wild Pampa plains, have always been very expert in cooking meat this way. Let’s meet this unique people, finding out who they are and why their favorite food is so famous worldwide. (continue)

: Argentine




Wasabi: green fire from Japan. Wasabi: green fire from Japan.

Wasabi: green fire from Japan.

‘W

asabi’ is produced from a plant of the same name originally from Japan. It’s generally presented as a green paste and is often used to accompany sushi. It’s very famous for its strong piquancy: so much to deserve the nickname ‘namida’, whose translation is ‘tear’. (coming soon)

: Japan




Naples: most typical food. Naples: most typical food.

Naples: most typical food.

‘O

sole mio’, one of the most famous Italian songs, effectively celebrates the joyful spirit of Naples and of its people. A spirit strongly present also in the food of this city: let’s get familiar with it, appreciating its history and its exquisite ingredients. Let’s be carried away by a whirlwind of colors and flavors overwhelming all the senses. (continue)

: Italy




Venice: most typical food. Venice: most typical food.

Venice: most typical food.

V

enice is without doubts one of the most fascinating places in the world. The foundations of its magnificent palaces, legacy of a glorious past, lay on a multitude of small islands, connected to each other by a dense network of narrow canals. Let’s navigate through them aboard a romantic ‘gondola’, looking for the most exquisite delicacies the ‘Doge’s city’ can offer. (continue)

: Italy




Sachertorte, taste of Vienna. Sachertorte, taste of Vienna.

Sachertorte, taste of Vienna.

S

achertorte: its taste is both austere and elegant, characteristics it has in common with the city where it was born, Vienna. It’s hard to try it without hearing the echo of a waltz, the passage of an ancient carriage or the clink of a sword. (continue)

: Austria




Marsala: Florio’s wine (img-03) Marsala: Florio’s wine (img-03)

Marsala: Florio’s wine.

M

arsala wine: even if its grapes are grown in Sicily, it was an Englishman the first to understand its great potential, as English were the first to really appreciate it. Anyway, it was an Italian family to make it famous worldwide: the Florios. (continue)

: Italy




Ballotta: Galileo's trattoria (img-05)

Ballotta: Galileo’s trattoria.

T

here are places where food, no matter how delicious, manages to acquire additional, unexpected flavour: places like ‘Ballotta’, a ‘trattoria’, serving typical specialities since the XVII Century to all kind of customers. Among them, very famous people such as Galileo Galilei … and many others! (continue)

: Italy



Frittelle and galani: sweets of the Venetian Carnival.

Frittelle and galani: sweets of the Venetian Carnival.

T

he Venetian Carnival: an event unique in the world, renewing its magic year after year. During the incredible festivities, the local confectioners prepare delicious ‘frittelle’ and ‘galani’: let’s taste them, surrounded by colorful masks and fascinating gondolas. (coming soon)

Escalopes with marsala wine

‘S

caloppina’ (the Italian for escalope), is one of the most famous Italian recipes. There are many types of it: one of the best is prepared using Marsala wine. (continue)

‘Potato Chips’

1956

, the American jazz singer Bulee “Slim” Gaillard dedicates a song to one of the most famous appetizers in the world: the name of this song is ‘Potato Chips’ (continue)



Empanadas in a milonga.

Empanadas in a milonga

‘E

mpanada’ is basically filled pastry dough: a simple and yet delicious preparation originally from Spain and much appreciated in many countries of South America. It’s also one of the food specialities served in the ‘milongas’, the tango ballrooms: the most famous are in Argentine, in the city of Buenos Aires. (coming soon)

Fire and chili pepper.

Fire and chili pepper

T

he heat sensation felt eating chili peppers is not real: it’s, in fact, due to the interaction between a substance, capsaicin, with some receptors inside the mouth.




The images bearing the logo ‘webfoodculture’ are copyrighted.

The following images are public domain:

img-01 (*) – Margherita of Savoy, Queen of Italy (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
img-02 (*) – A group of Argentine gauchos, 1890 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
img-03 (*) – ‘Fruit’, A.Mucha, 1897 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
img-04 (*) – The adolescent Bacchus, Caravaggio, 1595/1997 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
img-05 (*) – Portrait of Galileo Galilei, Justus Sustermans, 1640 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-Art} {PD-US}
img-06 (**) – Bing Cherries, photo by Peggy Greb, USDA ARS, US Agricultural Research Service (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}

The header images are public domain:

Image 01 (*) – Margerita of Savoy, Queen of Italy (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
Image 02 (*) – Graf Klemens von Metternich, T.Lawrence, 1830 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
Image 03 (**) – Chateau de Chantilly, image by Patik /Ellsass (Wikipedia Link)
Image 04 (*) – Still Life with Crab, Shrimps and Lobster, Clara Peeters, 1635/1640 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}
Image 05 (*) – A group of Argentine gauchos, 1890 (Wikipedia Link) {PD-US}

These images are made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0):

img-06 – Martinez cocktail, image owner: Will Shenton (Wikipedia Link)

The following images are published courtesy of:

img-05 – Antica Trattoria Ballotta, interior. Courtesy of Antica Trattoria Ballotta.
img-06 – Luxardo Maraschino, early XX Cent. advertisement. Courtesy of Girolamo Luxardo S.p.A.

(*) The copyright of this image has expired.
(**) Image released in public domain by its author.