Second


I

n Italy the second course is widely considered the heart of a meal: served food is usually, but not necessarily, the most caloric. The basic ingredients include large portions of meat or fish, though vegetables, cheese and many others are used as well.

FOOD IN THIS SECTION:

Recipes using a great variety of ingredients: meat and fish above all.




Asado by an Argentine gaucho. Asado by an Argentine gaucho.

Asado by an Argentine gaucho.

T

he literal translation of the word ‘asado’ is ‘roasted’. The so-called “gauchos”, undisputed rulers of the wild Pampa plains, have always been very expert in cooking meat using this method. Let’s meet this people, finding out who they are and why their favorite food is so famous worldwide. (continue)

: Argentine




The Radetzky's cutlets. The Radetzky's cutlets.

The Radetzky’s cutlets.

T

he Milanese cutlet and the Wiener Schnitzel have a very similar recipe: for many years it was not clear which one was invented first and if, in some way, one was a copy of the other. Something has changed recently: the discovery of a letter sent by the Field Marshal Radetzky “could” be useful to solve the issue. (continue)

: Austria




Count Dracula loves micis. Count Dracula loves micis.

Dracula hates the “mici”.

T

he title chosen for this article is clearly ironic. The so-called “mici”, a kind of meatballs typical from Romania, are quite famous for the huge quantity of garlic used to make them. It’s just as famous the hate of vampires for garlic, a true poison for their specie. Is this a mere coincidence? Well, maybe not … (coming soon)

: Romania




A chori on the Costanera. A chori on the Costanera.

A “chori” on the Costanera.

“C

ostanera Sur” is the promenade of Buenos Aires: it’s the place where its citizens, the so-called “portenos”, are used to relax, spending their free time strolling, playing, jogging … or just sitting at a table, drinking a beer and enjoying the incredible taste of the famous grilled Argentine meat. So, what better place to eat a “chori”? (coming soon)

: Argentine

Kafka about food ©:1

Hamburgers from Hamburg

A

s many of you probably already know, a “hamburger” is a sandwich stuffed with one (or more) patties of ground meat. What many probably don’t know, is that its name suggests the place of origin. “Hamburger” comes from “Hamburg”, the German city where its recipe was born, later brought in the United States by the many emigrants who moved there during the early years of the nineteenth century.




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©:1 (*) – Franz Kafka, 1906 (Wikipedia Link)

(*) The copyright of this image has expired.
(**) Image released in public domain by its author.